World’s Most Iconic Sandwiches (Slideshow)


Who knew there were so many ways to eat two slices of bread and a filling?

Vegemite Sandwich — Australia

This simple snack is iconically Australian and popular down under. It’s two slices of toast smeared with the yeasty brown paste, which as a bonus happens to be one of the richest known sources of vitamin B. Vegemite is made from the leftover yeast extract that’s a by-product from beer making. It’s salty and slightly meaty in taste and is enjoyed all over the world. Incidentally, many other countries (like England and South Africa) enjoy the similar product called Marmite, with a slightly different yeasty flavor, but no matter the name it’s still incredibly popular.

Donkey Burger — China

Donkeys are a pretty popular food source in China and Europe; the animals are usually raised both for their milk and meat products. The donkey burger is a hot sandwich (or though it has been known to be served cold) in Chinese cuisine and is heavily spiced and served on a bun. The best kind of donkey meat is slow-cooked between eight and 20 hours, so the meat retains it color and tenderness. Donkey meat is also a rich source of protein, iron, calcium, and phosphorus.

Vada Pav — India

Known as either Wada Pav or Vada Paav, this is arguably one of India’s favorite street foods. This handheld spicy veggie hamburger is made from batata vada potato fritter sandwiched between two slices of pav bread and traditionally comes with chutney made from shredded coconut, tamarind pulp, and garlic. Vada Pav’s origins were as a food for the poor (because it’s cheap to make), but it quickly caught on nationwide and is now one of India’s favorite fast food dishes, served even in the fanciest of hotels.

Arepa — Venezuela

Arepa technically refers to a delicious, chewy, crispy, maize-dough flatbread sandwiches filled with pretty much anything you could imagine, from chorizo and plantains to beef, pulled pork, cheese, and avocado. Traditionally arepa preparation is labor-intensive, requiring that the maize kernals be peeled and ground in a large mortar. If you’re pressed for time though, you can buy the maize flour and a kitchen appliance to make the arepas that look similar to a waffle iron.

Gatsby — South Africa

The Gatsby is wildly popular in Cape Town, so much so that any South African visiting the southwest of the country will make a point of tracking down a Gatsby from one of the dozens of street vendors and corner cafés dotted around the Cape and its seaside towns.

It’s similar to an American hoagie but always has layers of fish (usually cod or snoek) between layers of fries with salt and vinegar, mashed into a giant soft roll and topped with spicy peri peri sauce. They’re rumored to have gained popularity in the mid-1970s; the first one was allegedly made by Rashaad Pandy, an industrious fish and chips shop owner who had run out of fish during one afternoon lunch rush and was looking for another way to feed boatloads of hungry fisherman around Cape Town. It’s large enough to feed at least two people so you can buy it in halves… though many just buy a whole one and snack on it throughout the day.

Croque Monsieur — France

This popular French sandwich goes all the way back to the early 1900s when it was enjoyed in cafés and bars around cities like Paris as a quick snack. “Croque” mean “to crunch” and “Monsieur” means “mister.” It’s such a popular staple of the urban French menu that it was even mentioned in Proust’s In Search of Lost Time. It is essentially a very, very posh grilled ham and cheese, which uses Emmental or Gruyère. Sometimes it’s also served with a poached or fried egg on top.

Peanut-Butter and Jelly Sandwich — U.S.A

Americans love their PB&J sandwiches! Enjoyed since they were children, it’s still a popular breakfast sandwich, quick snack, and an “I’m-super-hungry-and-there’s-nothing-else-in-the-fridge snack.” Despite its popularity in the US, the rest of the world doesn’t quite agree — not only is peanut butter not widely consumed in Europe, but it’s also never mixed with jelly or fluff in a sandwich.

Bacon/ Chip Butty – U.K.

The chip butty is like your favorite childhood sandwich maturing into a delicious adult meal. Popular as midnight snack, greasy breakfast, lunchtime meal, or even supper, this sandwich is really handfuls of French fries between two slices of soft buttered bread. It’s generally enjoyed with dollops of “brown” sauce (usually HP sauce) and big pieces of crispy, streaky bacon.


14 of America's Most Essential Sandwich Recipes

Because sandwiches are the quintessential American food.

Take a look at the most popular sandwiches across the country. Each region is represent by the South, Northeast, Midwest, West, and the Pacific.

If you're unfamiliar with the Gerber, let us break it down for you: This open-faced ham and provolone cheese sandwich makes use of crusty French bread lathered with garlic butter. Finish this St. Louis masterpiece off by toasting it for a gooey, cheesy finish.

A southern picnic staple that gets its bite from Cheddar cheese and chipotle peppers, this version gets some extra twang with crispy fried green tomatoes layered between grilled bread.

Straight out of New Orleans, this Louisiana classic features fried shrimp drenched in a spicy rich remoulade sauce served on a buttered bun.

First served at Louisville's Brown Hotel, this broiled, open-faced sandwich is piled high with turkey, bacon, tomatoes and cheese sauce.

Anyone who has ever visited New Orlean's Central Grocery knows how delicious this mashup of deli meats and olive salad spread is&mdashattempt to recreate the magic at home with this recipe.

Local to Binghamton, New York, the chicken for this sandwich is marinated (here with lemon, olive oil, and herbs), grilled to perfection, and presented on soft Italian bread.

Another New York state original, this is not your standard roast beef sandwich. Rare, thin-cut beef gets a special kick from horseradish and the kummelweck roll, topped with salt and caraway seeds.

Whether you think the country's best lobster rolls hail from Maine or Connecticut, there's no denying these seafood sandwiches are delicious. This simple version features fresh Maine lobster, lemon, brown butter and New England-style rolls.

Pork tenderloin is pounded thin and coated in batter made extra crunchy with crushed Saltines and panko crumbs, then fried to make this tasty sandwich, which is especially popular in Indiana.

This hearty sandwich features a blend of slow-cooked, shredded beef, giardiniera and red peppers, topped with mozzarella cheese on Italian bread.

The jury is out as to whether this classic sandwich was invented in Omaha, Nebraska or New York City, but either way, you can get your corned beef fix with this Reuben recipe, drenched in Thousand Island dressing and loaded on top of rye bread.

Also known as a Western sandwich, this classic is made with freshly beaten eggs, diced ham, mushrooms, and bell peppers. Place the omelet between two buttered slices of bread and you've got yourself a tasty lunch (or breakfast!).

The best avocados in the U.S. come from California, so if you're going to have a West Coast sandwich, it better have at least a few slices of this creamy green fruit on it!

This sandwich, born in Los Angeles (two restaurants actually claim to have invented it), features sliced roast beef topped with cheese, served with a side of hot au jus dip.


14 of America's Most Essential Sandwich Recipes

Because sandwiches are the quintessential American food.

Take a look at the most popular sandwiches across the country. Each region is represent by the South, Northeast, Midwest, West, and the Pacific.

If you're unfamiliar with the Gerber, let us break it down for you: This open-faced ham and provolone cheese sandwich makes use of crusty French bread lathered with garlic butter. Finish this St. Louis masterpiece off by toasting it for a gooey, cheesy finish.

A southern picnic staple that gets its bite from Cheddar cheese and chipotle peppers, this version gets some extra twang with crispy fried green tomatoes layered between grilled bread.

Straight out of New Orleans, this Louisiana classic features fried shrimp drenched in a spicy rich remoulade sauce served on a buttered bun.

First served at Louisville's Brown Hotel, this broiled, open-faced sandwich is piled high with turkey, bacon, tomatoes and cheese sauce.

Anyone who has ever visited New Orlean's Central Grocery knows how delicious this mashup of deli meats and olive salad spread is&mdashattempt to recreate the magic at home with this recipe.

Local to Binghamton, New York, the chicken for this sandwich is marinated (here with lemon, olive oil, and herbs), grilled to perfection, and presented on soft Italian bread.

Another New York state original, this is not your standard roast beef sandwich. Rare, thin-cut beef gets a special kick from horseradish and the kummelweck roll, topped with salt and caraway seeds.

Whether you think the country's best lobster rolls hail from Maine or Connecticut, there's no denying these seafood sandwiches are delicious. This simple version features fresh Maine lobster, lemon, brown butter and New England-style rolls.

Pork tenderloin is pounded thin and coated in batter made extra crunchy with crushed Saltines and panko crumbs, then fried to make this tasty sandwich, which is especially popular in Indiana.

This hearty sandwich features a blend of slow-cooked, shredded beef, giardiniera and red peppers, topped with mozzarella cheese on Italian bread.

The jury is out as to whether this classic sandwich was invented in Omaha, Nebraska or New York City, but either way, you can get your corned beef fix with this Reuben recipe, drenched in Thousand Island dressing and loaded on top of rye bread.

Also known as a Western sandwich, this classic is made with freshly beaten eggs, diced ham, mushrooms, and bell peppers. Place the omelet between two buttered slices of bread and you've got yourself a tasty lunch (or breakfast!).

The best avocados in the U.S. come from California, so if you're going to have a West Coast sandwich, it better have at least a few slices of this creamy green fruit on it!

This sandwich, born in Los Angeles (two restaurants actually claim to have invented it), features sliced roast beef topped with cheese, served with a side of hot au jus dip.


14 of America's Most Essential Sandwich Recipes

Because sandwiches are the quintessential American food.

Take a look at the most popular sandwiches across the country. Each region is represent by the South, Northeast, Midwest, West, and the Pacific.

If you're unfamiliar with the Gerber, let us break it down for you: This open-faced ham and provolone cheese sandwich makes use of crusty French bread lathered with garlic butter. Finish this St. Louis masterpiece off by toasting it for a gooey, cheesy finish.

A southern picnic staple that gets its bite from Cheddar cheese and chipotle peppers, this version gets some extra twang with crispy fried green tomatoes layered between grilled bread.

Straight out of New Orleans, this Louisiana classic features fried shrimp drenched in a spicy rich remoulade sauce served on a buttered bun.

First served at Louisville's Brown Hotel, this broiled, open-faced sandwich is piled high with turkey, bacon, tomatoes and cheese sauce.

Anyone who has ever visited New Orlean's Central Grocery knows how delicious this mashup of deli meats and olive salad spread is&mdashattempt to recreate the magic at home with this recipe.

Local to Binghamton, New York, the chicken for this sandwich is marinated (here with lemon, olive oil, and herbs), grilled to perfection, and presented on soft Italian bread.

Another New York state original, this is not your standard roast beef sandwich. Rare, thin-cut beef gets a special kick from horseradish and the kummelweck roll, topped with salt and caraway seeds.

Whether you think the country's best lobster rolls hail from Maine or Connecticut, there's no denying these seafood sandwiches are delicious. This simple version features fresh Maine lobster, lemon, brown butter and New England-style rolls.

Pork tenderloin is pounded thin and coated in batter made extra crunchy with crushed Saltines and panko crumbs, then fried to make this tasty sandwich, which is especially popular in Indiana.

This hearty sandwich features a blend of slow-cooked, shredded beef, giardiniera and red peppers, topped with mozzarella cheese on Italian bread.

The jury is out as to whether this classic sandwich was invented in Omaha, Nebraska or New York City, but either way, you can get your corned beef fix with this Reuben recipe, drenched in Thousand Island dressing and loaded on top of rye bread.

Also known as a Western sandwich, this classic is made with freshly beaten eggs, diced ham, mushrooms, and bell peppers. Place the omelet between two buttered slices of bread and you've got yourself a tasty lunch (or breakfast!).

The best avocados in the U.S. come from California, so if you're going to have a West Coast sandwich, it better have at least a few slices of this creamy green fruit on it!

This sandwich, born in Los Angeles (two restaurants actually claim to have invented it), features sliced roast beef topped with cheese, served with a side of hot au jus dip.


14 of America's Most Essential Sandwich Recipes

Because sandwiches are the quintessential American food.

Take a look at the most popular sandwiches across the country. Each region is represent by the South, Northeast, Midwest, West, and the Pacific.

If you're unfamiliar with the Gerber, let us break it down for you: This open-faced ham and provolone cheese sandwich makes use of crusty French bread lathered with garlic butter. Finish this St. Louis masterpiece off by toasting it for a gooey, cheesy finish.

A southern picnic staple that gets its bite from Cheddar cheese and chipotle peppers, this version gets some extra twang with crispy fried green tomatoes layered between grilled bread.

Straight out of New Orleans, this Louisiana classic features fried shrimp drenched in a spicy rich remoulade sauce served on a buttered bun.

First served at Louisville's Brown Hotel, this broiled, open-faced sandwich is piled high with turkey, bacon, tomatoes and cheese sauce.

Anyone who has ever visited New Orlean's Central Grocery knows how delicious this mashup of deli meats and olive salad spread is&mdashattempt to recreate the magic at home with this recipe.

Local to Binghamton, New York, the chicken for this sandwich is marinated (here with lemon, olive oil, and herbs), grilled to perfection, and presented on soft Italian bread.

Another New York state original, this is not your standard roast beef sandwich. Rare, thin-cut beef gets a special kick from horseradish and the kummelweck roll, topped with salt and caraway seeds.

Whether you think the country's best lobster rolls hail from Maine or Connecticut, there's no denying these seafood sandwiches are delicious. This simple version features fresh Maine lobster, lemon, brown butter and New England-style rolls.

Pork tenderloin is pounded thin and coated in batter made extra crunchy with crushed Saltines and panko crumbs, then fried to make this tasty sandwich, which is especially popular in Indiana.

This hearty sandwich features a blend of slow-cooked, shredded beef, giardiniera and red peppers, topped with mozzarella cheese on Italian bread.

The jury is out as to whether this classic sandwich was invented in Omaha, Nebraska or New York City, but either way, you can get your corned beef fix with this Reuben recipe, drenched in Thousand Island dressing and loaded on top of rye bread.

Also known as a Western sandwich, this classic is made with freshly beaten eggs, diced ham, mushrooms, and bell peppers. Place the omelet between two buttered slices of bread and you've got yourself a tasty lunch (or breakfast!).

The best avocados in the U.S. come from California, so if you're going to have a West Coast sandwich, it better have at least a few slices of this creamy green fruit on it!

This sandwich, born in Los Angeles (two restaurants actually claim to have invented it), features sliced roast beef topped with cheese, served with a side of hot au jus dip.


14 of America's Most Essential Sandwich Recipes

Because sandwiches are the quintessential American food.

Take a look at the most popular sandwiches across the country. Each region is represent by the South, Northeast, Midwest, West, and the Pacific.

If you're unfamiliar with the Gerber, let us break it down for you: This open-faced ham and provolone cheese sandwich makes use of crusty French bread lathered with garlic butter. Finish this St. Louis masterpiece off by toasting it for a gooey, cheesy finish.

A southern picnic staple that gets its bite from Cheddar cheese and chipotle peppers, this version gets some extra twang with crispy fried green tomatoes layered between grilled bread.

Straight out of New Orleans, this Louisiana classic features fried shrimp drenched in a spicy rich remoulade sauce served on a buttered bun.

First served at Louisville's Brown Hotel, this broiled, open-faced sandwich is piled high with turkey, bacon, tomatoes and cheese sauce.

Anyone who has ever visited New Orlean's Central Grocery knows how delicious this mashup of deli meats and olive salad spread is&mdashattempt to recreate the magic at home with this recipe.

Local to Binghamton, New York, the chicken for this sandwich is marinated (here with lemon, olive oil, and herbs), grilled to perfection, and presented on soft Italian bread.

Another New York state original, this is not your standard roast beef sandwich. Rare, thin-cut beef gets a special kick from horseradish and the kummelweck roll, topped with salt and caraway seeds.

Whether you think the country's best lobster rolls hail from Maine or Connecticut, there's no denying these seafood sandwiches are delicious. This simple version features fresh Maine lobster, lemon, brown butter and New England-style rolls.

Pork tenderloin is pounded thin and coated in batter made extra crunchy with crushed Saltines and panko crumbs, then fried to make this tasty sandwich, which is especially popular in Indiana.

This hearty sandwich features a blend of slow-cooked, shredded beef, giardiniera and red peppers, topped with mozzarella cheese on Italian bread.

The jury is out as to whether this classic sandwich was invented in Omaha, Nebraska or New York City, but either way, you can get your corned beef fix with this Reuben recipe, drenched in Thousand Island dressing and loaded on top of rye bread.

Also known as a Western sandwich, this classic is made with freshly beaten eggs, diced ham, mushrooms, and bell peppers. Place the omelet between two buttered slices of bread and you've got yourself a tasty lunch (or breakfast!).

The best avocados in the U.S. come from California, so if you're going to have a West Coast sandwich, it better have at least a few slices of this creamy green fruit on it!

This sandwich, born in Los Angeles (two restaurants actually claim to have invented it), features sliced roast beef topped with cheese, served with a side of hot au jus dip.


14 of America's Most Essential Sandwich Recipes

Because sandwiches are the quintessential American food.

Take a look at the most popular sandwiches across the country. Each region is represent by the South, Northeast, Midwest, West, and the Pacific.

If you're unfamiliar with the Gerber, let us break it down for you: This open-faced ham and provolone cheese sandwich makes use of crusty French bread lathered with garlic butter. Finish this St. Louis masterpiece off by toasting it for a gooey, cheesy finish.

A southern picnic staple that gets its bite from Cheddar cheese and chipotle peppers, this version gets some extra twang with crispy fried green tomatoes layered between grilled bread.

Straight out of New Orleans, this Louisiana classic features fried shrimp drenched in a spicy rich remoulade sauce served on a buttered bun.

First served at Louisville's Brown Hotel, this broiled, open-faced sandwich is piled high with turkey, bacon, tomatoes and cheese sauce.

Anyone who has ever visited New Orlean's Central Grocery knows how delicious this mashup of deli meats and olive salad spread is&mdashattempt to recreate the magic at home with this recipe.

Local to Binghamton, New York, the chicken for this sandwich is marinated (here with lemon, olive oil, and herbs), grilled to perfection, and presented on soft Italian bread.

Another New York state original, this is not your standard roast beef sandwich. Rare, thin-cut beef gets a special kick from horseradish and the kummelweck roll, topped with salt and caraway seeds.

Whether you think the country's best lobster rolls hail from Maine or Connecticut, there's no denying these seafood sandwiches are delicious. This simple version features fresh Maine lobster, lemon, brown butter and New England-style rolls.

Pork tenderloin is pounded thin and coated in batter made extra crunchy with crushed Saltines and panko crumbs, then fried to make this tasty sandwich, which is especially popular in Indiana.

This hearty sandwich features a blend of slow-cooked, shredded beef, giardiniera and red peppers, topped with mozzarella cheese on Italian bread.

The jury is out as to whether this classic sandwich was invented in Omaha, Nebraska or New York City, but either way, you can get your corned beef fix with this Reuben recipe, drenched in Thousand Island dressing and loaded on top of rye bread.

Also known as a Western sandwich, this classic is made with freshly beaten eggs, diced ham, mushrooms, and bell peppers. Place the omelet between two buttered slices of bread and you've got yourself a tasty lunch (or breakfast!).

The best avocados in the U.S. come from California, so if you're going to have a West Coast sandwich, it better have at least a few slices of this creamy green fruit on it!

This sandwich, born in Los Angeles (two restaurants actually claim to have invented it), features sliced roast beef topped with cheese, served with a side of hot au jus dip.


14 of America's Most Essential Sandwich Recipes

Because sandwiches are the quintessential American food.

Take a look at the most popular sandwiches across the country. Each region is represent by the South, Northeast, Midwest, West, and the Pacific.

If you're unfamiliar with the Gerber, let us break it down for you: This open-faced ham and provolone cheese sandwich makes use of crusty French bread lathered with garlic butter. Finish this St. Louis masterpiece off by toasting it for a gooey, cheesy finish.

A southern picnic staple that gets its bite from Cheddar cheese and chipotle peppers, this version gets some extra twang with crispy fried green tomatoes layered between grilled bread.

Straight out of New Orleans, this Louisiana classic features fried shrimp drenched in a spicy rich remoulade sauce served on a buttered bun.

First served at Louisville's Brown Hotel, this broiled, open-faced sandwich is piled high with turkey, bacon, tomatoes and cheese sauce.

Anyone who has ever visited New Orlean's Central Grocery knows how delicious this mashup of deli meats and olive salad spread is&mdashattempt to recreate the magic at home with this recipe.

Local to Binghamton, New York, the chicken for this sandwich is marinated (here with lemon, olive oil, and herbs), grilled to perfection, and presented on soft Italian bread.

Another New York state original, this is not your standard roast beef sandwich. Rare, thin-cut beef gets a special kick from horseradish and the kummelweck roll, topped with salt and caraway seeds.

Whether you think the country's best lobster rolls hail from Maine or Connecticut, there's no denying these seafood sandwiches are delicious. This simple version features fresh Maine lobster, lemon, brown butter and New England-style rolls.

Pork tenderloin is pounded thin and coated in batter made extra crunchy with crushed Saltines and panko crumbs, then fried to make this tasty sandwich, which is especially popular in Indiana.

This hearty sandwich features a blend of slow-cooked, shredded beef, giardiniera and red peppers, topped with mozzarella cheese on Italian bread.

The jury is out as to whether this classic sandwich was invented in Omaha, Nebraska or New York City, but either way, you can get your corned beef fix with this Reuben recipe, drenched in Thousand Island dressing and loaded on top of rye bread.

Also known as a Western sandwich, this classic is made with freshly beaten eggs, diced ham, mushrooms, and bell peppers. Place the omelet between two buttered slices of bread and you've got yourself a tasty lunch (or breakfast!).

The best avocados in the U.S. come from California, so if you're going to have a West Coast sandwich, it better have at least a few slices of this creamy green fruit on it!

This sandwich, born in Los Angeles (two restaurants actually claim to have invented it), features sliced roast beef topped with cheese, served with a side of hot au jus dip.


14 of America's Most Essential Sandwich Recipes

Because sandwiches are the quintessential American food.

Take a look at the most popular sandwiches across the country. Each region is represent by the South, Northeast, Midwest, West, and the Pacific.

If you're unfamiliar with the Gerber, let us break it down for you: This open-faced ham and provolone cheese sandwich makes use of crusty French bread lathered with garlic butter. Finish this St. Louis masterpiece off by toasting it for a gooey, cheesy finish.

A southern picnic staple that gets its bite from Cheddar cheese and chipotle peppers, this version gets some extra twang with crispy fried green tomatoes layered between grilled bread.

Straight out of New Orleans, this Louisiana classic features fried shrimp drenched in a spicy rich remoulade sauce served on a buttered bun.

First served at Louisville's Brown Hotel, this broiled, open-faced sandwich is piled high with turkey, bacon, tomatoes and cheese sauce.

Anyone who has ever visited New Orlean's Central Grocery knows how delicious this mashup of deli meats and olive salad spread is&mdashattempt to recreate the magic at home with this recipe.

Local to Binghamton, New York, the chicken for this sandwich is marinated (here with lemon, olive oil, and herbs), grilled to perfection, and presented on soft Italian bread.

Another New York state original, this is not your standard roast beef sandwich. Rare, thin-cut beef gets a special kick from horseradish and the kummelweck roll, topped with salt and caraway seeds.

Whether you think the country's best lobster rolls hail from Maine or Connecticut, there's no denying these seafood sandwiches are delicious. This simple version features fresh Maine lobster, lemon, brown butter and New England-style rolls.

Pork tenderloin is pounded thin and coated in batter made extra crunchy with crushed Saltines and panko crumbs, then fried to make this tasty sandwich, which is especially popular in Indiana.

This hearty sandwich features a blend of slow-cooked, shredded beef, giardiniera and red peppers, topped with mozzarella cheese on Italian bread.

The jury is out as to whether this classic sandwich was invented in Omaha, Nebraska or New York City, but either way, you can get your corned beef fix with this Reuben recipe, drenched in Thousand Island dressing and loaded on top of rye bread.

Also known as a Western sandwich, this classic is made with freshly beaten eggs, diced ham, mushrooms, and bell peppers. Place the omelet between two buttered slices of bread and you've got yourself a tasty lunch (or breakfast!).

The best avocados in the U.S. come from California, so if you're going to have a West Coast sandwich, it better have at least a few slices of this creamy green fruit on it!

This sandwich, born in Los Angeles (two restaurants actually claim to have invented it), features sliced roast beef topped with cheese, served with a side of hot au jus dip.


14 of America's Most Essential Sandwich Recipes

Because sandwiches are the quintessential American food.

Take a look at the most popular sandwiches across the country. Each region is represent by the South, Northeast, Midwest, West, and the Pacific.

If you're unfamiliar with the Gerber, let us break it down for you: This open-faced ham and provolone cheese sandwich makes use of crusty French bread lathered with garlic butter. Finish this St. Louis masterpiece off by toasting it for a gooey, cheesy finish.

A southern picnic staple that gets its bite from Cheddar cheese and chipotle peppers, this version gets some extra twang with crispy fried green tomatoes layered between grilled bread.

Straight out of New Orleans, this Louisiana classic features fried shrimp drenched in a spicy rich remoulade sauce served on a buttered bun.

First served at Louisville's Brown Hotel, this broiled, open-faced sandwich is piled high with turkey, bacon, tomatoes and cheese sauce.

Anyone who has ever visited New Orlean's Central Grocery knows how delicious this mashup of deli meats and olive salad spread is&mdashattempt to recreate the magic at home with this recipe.

Local to Binghamton, New York, the chicken for this sandwich is marinated (here with lemon, olive oil, and herbs), grilled to perfection, and presented on soft Italian bread.

Another New York state original, this is not your standard roast beef sandwich. Rare, thin-cut beef gets a special kick from horseradish and the kummelweck roll, topped with salt and caraway seeds.

Whether you think the country's best lobster rolls hail from Maine or Connecticut, there's no denying these seafood sandwiches are delicious. This simple version features fresh Maine lobster, lemon, brown butter and New England-style rolls.

Pork tenderloin is pounded thin and coated in batter made extra crunchy with crushed Saltines and panko crumbs, then fried to make this tasty sandwich, which is especially popular in Indiana.

This hearty sandwich features a blend of slow-cooked, shredded beef, giardiniera and red peppers, topped with mozzarella cheese on Italian bread.

The jury is out as to whether this classic sandwich was invented in Omaha, Nebraska or New York City, but either way, you can get your corned beef fix with this Reuben recipe, drenched in Thousand Island dressing and loaded on top of rye bread.

Also known as a Western sandwich, this classic is made with freshly beaten eggs, diced ham, mushrooms, and bell peppers. Place the omelet between two buttered slices of bread and you've got yourself a tasty lunch (or breakfast!).

The best avocados in the U.S. come from California, so if you're going to have a West Coast sandwich, it better have at least a few slices of this creamy green fruit on it!

This sandwich, born in Los Angeles (two restaurants actually claim to have invented it), features sliced roast beef topped with cheese, served with a side of hot au jus dip.


14 of America's Most Essential Sandwich Recipes

Because sandwiches are the quintessential American food.

Take a look at the most popular sandwiches across the country. Each region is represent by the South, Northeast, Midwest, West, and the Pacific.

If you're unfamiliar with the Gerber, let us break it down for you: This open-faced ham and provolone cheese sandwich makes use of crusty French bread lathered with garlic butter. Finish this St. Louis masterpiece off by toasting it for a gooey, cheesy finish.

A southern picnic staple that gets its bite from Cheddar cheese and chipotle peppers, this version gets some extra twang with crispy fried green tomatoes layered between grilled bread.

Straight out of New Orleans, this Louisiana classic features fried shrimp drenched in a spicy rich remoulade sauce served on a buttered bun.

First served at Louisville's Brown Hotel, this broiled, open-faced sandwich is piled high with turkey, bacon, tomatoes and cheese sauce.

Anyone who has ever visited New Orlean's Central Grocery knows how delicious this mashup of deli meats and olive salad spread is&mdashattempt to recreate the magic at home with this recipe.

Local to Binghamton, New York, the chicken for this sandwich is marinated (here with lemon, olive oil, and herbs), grilled to perfection, and presented on soft Italian bread.

Another New York state original, this is not your standard roast beef sandwich. Rare, thin-cut beef gets a special kick from horseradish and the kummelweck roll, topped with salt and caraway seeds.

Whether you think the country's best lobster rolls hail from Maine or Connecticut, there's no denying these seafood sandwiches are delicious. This simple version features fresh Maine lobster, lemon, brown butter and New England-style rolls.

Pork tenderloin is pounded thin and coated in batter made extra crunchy with crushed Saltines and panko crumbs, then fried to make this tasty sandwich, which is especially popular in Indiana.

This hearty sandwich features a blend of slow-cooked, shredded beef, giardiniera and red peppers, topped with mozzarella cheese on Italian bread.

The jury is out as to whether this classic sandwich was invented in Omaha, Nebraska or New York City, but either way, you can get your corned beef fix with this Reuben recipe, drenched in Thousand Island dressing and loaded on top of rye bread.

Also known as a Western sandwich, this classic is made with freshly beaten eggs, diced ham, mushrooms, and bell peppers. Place the omelet between two buttered slices of bread and you've got yourself a tasty lunch (or breakfast!).

The best avocados in the U.S. come from California, so if you're going to have a West Coast sandwich, it better have at least a few slices of this creamy green fruit on it!

This sandwich, born in Los Angeles (two restaurants actually claim to have invented it), features sliced roast beef topped with cheese, served with a side of hot au jus dip.


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