Where to Find the Best Paella in Spain



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It is very likely that you've never had paella — at least not paella in the sense that the good people of the southeastern Spanish seaside capital of Valencia (pictured below) and the surrounding countryside, who invented it in the first place, would define it.

Like so many other emblematic traditional dishes — bouillabaisse, salade niçoise, fettuccine Alfredo, chili con carne — paella is a dish so frequently adapted, misinterpreted, gussied-up, and bastardized that the glorious original that got all the attention in the first place has become all but forgotten in most quarters. I've had paella made with long-grain and even instant rice; I've had it made with chicken stock, which would be blasphemy to a Valencian; I've seen recipes for Italian and Asian-fusion paella; the Los Angeles Timeseven once ran one for a quick-and-easy version made with leftover turkey, canned chopped clams, pepperoni, and Spanish rice mix — cooked in a microwave, of course. (Photo: Flickr/C.Y.R.I.L.)

Paella valenciana — the real thing — is one of the great rice dishes of the world, as honest and straightforward, and as definitive of the culture that created it, as a classic risotto milanese or a Korean bibimbop. Even in Spain itself, it is often misunderstood, badly cooked, and/or needlessly overladen with ingredients. The paella I'm talking about is not a baking dish full of yellow rice loaded with shrimp, clams, mussels, sausage, pork loin, chicken, peas, red peppers, and a few other things. It includes no seafood at all, in fact. In its purest, most authentic form, it is made with chicken, but the other usual ingredients are just rabbit, three kinds of beans (white beans, like the Italian cannellini; broad green beans; and garrofons, which are like butter beans), and sometimes snails, enhanced with a bit of onion and tomato and frequently but not always flavored with saffron. Aficionados will tell you that it's okay to sprinkle in some fresh rosemary, too, but only if you're not using snails — because the snails that would end up in paella are plucked from the fields, where rosemary would have been part of their diet, so they'd be bringing their own.

The rice used for paella, of course, must be a Valencian variety. Bomba is the best-known kind, but I know paella cooks who think it absorbs liquid too quickly and who prefer other local cultivars like fonsa or gleva. And note that there are two kinds of bomba, that from Valencia and that from Calasparra, in Murcia, to the south. A Valencian would no sooner use Murcian rice than a Bostonian would put tomatoes in his clam chowder. The cooking medium for the rice is plain water. Valencians will tell you, in fact, that only water from their aquifiers has precisely the right mineral content to produce perfect paella.

Some other rules for paella valenciana, at least in Valencia: It must be cooked over a hot wood fire, often of dried vine cuttings. (The smoke actually faintly flavors the rice.) Even though it uses short-grain rice like risotto does, and though risotto must be stirred constantly, paella is never stirred once the ingredients are assembled. It is never eaten hot, but allowed to sit for at least 30 or 40 minutes and often let cool to room temperature. And, at least in its home region, it is eaten only for lunch, never dinner, the theory being that it's entirely too rich a dish for an evening meal.

Paella-lovers will argue endlessly about where to find the best example of the dish, but my vote would go to a little place called Restaurante Levante, in Benisanó, 15 miles or so northwest of Valencia. Here, you will find paella valenciana made according to all the rules and strictures mentioned above, by Rafael Vidal, who was once named Mejor Paellero, or best paella maker, for the entire Valencia region, and who has cooked paella for the King of Spain.


Learn To Cook Paella At Home

Paella started as a humble countryside meal, cooked by farmers and herders in the fields and mountains surrounding Valencia and Alicante. Now it is world-famous, a symbol of Spanish cuisine so recognizable that it has even become its own emoji. Making paella is an art but it&rsquos not impossible for a home cook &ndash it just takes some care and patience.

What You'll Need

The Pan: The proper cookware for making paella and other arroces is a round flat pan called &ndash you guessed it &ndash a paella. The best paella pans are steel stainless for minimal care, carbon steel for something more traditional &ndash which ensures that heat is evenly distributed. Pans can range in size from 10 inches, which will serve two people, to more than a meter, for serving the masses. Check out paella pans here.

The Rice: One of the keys to great paella is using the proper rice &ndash not just anything will do. Two Spanish varieties &ndash bomba and calasparra &ndash are favored for their unique ability to expand to 2-3 times their size, absorbing flavorful liquid as they grow, without getting soft or mushy. Buy our favorite Calasparra rice here.

The Ingredients: Get creative &ndash start with meat if you want, layer in evenly-cut vegetables, and you can even add a healthy amount of sofrito for extra depth. Garlic, saffron, rosemary, pimentón, bay leaves &ndash all will help add flavor to the rice, if used in balance.

The Liquid: Water is oftentimes the best for making a good paella, if you've built up enough flavor with your ingredients. If you happen to have a good homemade vegetable or meat stock on hand, use it &ndash you&rsquoll get a deeper flavor in the rice, but be sure to balance out adding salt. This is our favorite broth for making paella.

The Heat: Traditionally, paella is cooked over a wood fire outdoors &ndash oftentimes starting with logs of wood and ending with a burst of high heat from dried vine clippings. This gives the paella a wonderful wood smoky aroma which complements the addition of pimentón, and the final kick of high heat helps ensure a crispy socarrat. In the absence of an outdoor cooking space, gas or electric heat will do &ndash just make sure it&rsquos even under the pan.

The Timing: Once the rice is in the pan, it&rsquos time to set a clock and wait. This is both the easiest and most challenging moment of the process: patience is key. Every rice is different, based on its variety and its age, and oftentimes the best way to tell how long it should be cooked is to read the instructions on the bag.

Get that soccarat. Near the end of cooking, with just a few minutes remaining, crank the heat up &ndash that&rsquos how you&rsquoll get the delicious crunchy soccarat at the bottom of the rice.

Get Creative In The Kitchen

There is a time and a place for the traditional Valencian paella, made with rabbit, chicken, two kinds of beans, rosemary, and saffron. And then there&rsquos a time and place for everything else &ndash there are unlimited ways to construct an arroz, none of which are wrong. Get creative &ndash start with meat if you want, layer in evenly-cut vegetables, and you can even add a healthy amount of sofrito for extra depth. Garlic, saffron, rosemary, pimettón, bay leaves &ndash all will help add flavor to the rice, if used in balance. Here are two of our favorite recipes.

Seafood Paella

For the Salmorra:
INGREDIENTS
1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil, preferably José Andrés Extra Virgin Olive Oil
12 cloves garlic, peeled
3 ñora chile peppers (or any other dried sweet chile pepper), seeded
One 16-ounces can plum tomatoes, drained
1 teaspoon sugar
1/8 teaspoon Spanish smoked paprika

Heat the oil in a medium pot over medium heat. Add garlic and sauté until soft, about 2 minutes.

Add the chile peppers and toast, stirring, for about 3 minutes, then add the tomatoes and sugar.

Cook until the liquid evaporates and the mixture is a dark red-brown color, about 15 minutes. Stir in the paprika.

Transfer the mixture to a blender and purée. Pour into a bowl, and season with salt, to taste.

Notes: Salmorra may be kept in the refrigerator, covered with plastic wrap, for up to 10 days. Drizzle the top with olive oil to keep sauce from drying out.

For the rice:
INGREDIENTS
Extra virgin olive oil, preferably José Andrés Extra Virgin Olive Oil
8 large whole shrimp, peeled with heads and tails intact, deveined
4 ounces monkfish, cut into ½-inch cubes
2 ½ ounces fresh tuna, cut into 1/2-inch cubes
2 ounces fresh squid, cleaned and cut into ¼-inch rings
1 clove garlic, finely chopped
¼ cup Salmorra
1 cup Spanish bomba rice
Pinch of saffron
3 cups hot, high-quality seafood stock

Heat 2 tablespoons of the olive oil in a 13-inch paella pan over high heat.

Add the shrimp and sear for about 1 minute on each side. Transfer shrimp to a plate. Pour 2 more tablespoons of the olive oil into the paella pan, add the monkfish, tuna and squid and sauté for 2 minutes.

Stir in the garlic and cook for 1 minute. Add the salmorra and rice and cook for 1 minute more, stirring to coat the rice with the sauce. Set a timer for 5 minutes, increase the heat to high and add the hot stock.

Bring to a boil, add the saffron and season with salt. Stir the rice during the first 5 minutes while boiling, then lower the heat and simmer for an additional 11 minutes. Do not stir the rice again as it may cause it to cook unevenly. After about 8 minutes, lay the reserved shrimp on top of the paella to finish cooking for last few minutes. The paella is finished when the rice has absorbed all of the liquid.

Remove the paella from the heat, cover with a clean kitchen towel and let the paella rest for 5 minutes before serving. Serve with spoonful&rsquos of aioli (garlic mayonnaise) and a green salad, if you like.

Vegetable Arroz

INGREDIENTS
¼ cup Spanish extra virgin olive oil
2 yellow squash, cut in ½&rdquo cubes
1 medium eggplant, cut in ½&rdquo cubes
1 cauliflower, broken into florets
¼ pound wild mushrooms, roughly chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 tomatoes, diced
¼ cup Sofrito
1 cup dry white wine
Pinch of saffron, crushed
3 cups vegetable broth, like Aneto
1 cup Spanish bomba or calasparra rice
¼ cup fresh or frozen green peas
Sea salt, to taste
Allioli, for serving

In a 13-inch paella pan, heat the extra virgin olive oil over medium-high heat. Add the squash to the pan and brown it on all sides. Add the squash and cauliflower and cook for another 2-3 minutes, then add the mushrooms and garlic and cook for another 2-3 minutes. Stir in the diced tomatoes and the sofrito and cook for a minute, then add the white wine and reduce everything by half.

Add the crushed saffron to the pan and then the broth. Increase the heat to high and bring to a boil, then let it boil for 2-3 minutes. Add the rice and peas and stir until everything is combined, then add salt to taste. Check the box or bag the rice came in &ndash you&rsquoll want to cook the rice as long as is recommended (timing can vary by rice type &ndash always keep the bag!) You want the rice to be slightly al dente, with a nice firm center. Set a timer, and then don&rsquot stir as the rice is cooking. When you have 2 minutes left, increase the heat to high to get the crunchy soccarat at the bottom of the pan. When the rice is done, remove the pan from the heat and let it sit for 5 minutes before serving.

Serve with allioli and share the soccarat with everyone &ndash no matter how much you want to save it exclusively for the chef (yourself).


Learn To Cook Paella At Home

Paella started as a humble countryside meal, cooked by farmers and herders in the fields and mountains surrounding Valencia and Alicante. Now it is world-famous, a symbol of Spanish cuisine so recognizable that it has even become its own emoji. Making paella is an art but it&rsquos not impossible for a home cook &ndash it just takes some care and patience.

What You'll Need

The Pan: The proper cookware for making paella and other arroces is a round flat pan called &ndash you guessed it &ndash a paella. The best paella pans are steel stainless for minimal care, carbon steel for something more traditional &ndash which ensures that heat is evenly distributed. Pans can range in size from 10 inches, which will serve two people, to more than a meter, for serving the masses. Check out paella pans here.

The Rice: One of the keys to great paella is using the proper rice &ndash not just anything will do. Two Spanish varieties &ndash bomba and calasparra &ndash are favored for their unique ability to expand to 2-3 times their size, absorbing flavorful liquid as they grow, without getting soft or mushy. Buy our favorite Calasparra rice here.

The Ingredients: Get creative &ndash start with meat if you want, layer in evenly-cut vegetables, and you can even add a healthy amount of sofrito for extra depth. Garlic, saffron, rosemary, pimentón, bay leaves &ndash all will help add flavor to the rice, if used in balance.

The Liquid: Water is oftentimes the best for making a good paella, if you've built up enough flavor with your ingredients. If you happen to have a good homemade vegetable or meat stock on hand, use it &ndash you&rsquoll get a deeper flavor in the rice, but be sure to balance out adding salt. This is our favorite broth for making paella.

The Heat: Traditionally, paella is cooked over a wood fire outdoors &ndash oftentimes starting with logs of wood and ending with a burst of high heat from dried vine clippings. This gives the paella a wonderful wood smoky aroma which complements the addition of pimentón, and the final kick of high heat helps ensure a crispy socarrat. In the absence of an outdoor cooking space, gas or electric heat will do &ndash just make sure it&rsquos even under the pan.

The Timing: Once the rice is in the pan, it&rsquos time to set a clock and wait. This is both the easiest and most challenging moment of the process: patience is key. Every rice is different, based on its variety and its age, and oftentimes the best way to tell how long it should be cooked is to read the instructions on the bag.

Get that soccarat. Near the end of cooking, with just a few minutes remaining, crank the heat up &ndash that&rsquos how you&rsquoll get the delicious crunchy soccarat at the bottom of the rice.

Get Creative In The Kitchen

There is a time and a place for the traditional Valencian paella, made with rabbit, chicken, two kinds of beans, rosemary, and saffron. And then there&rsquos a time and place for everything else &ndash there are unlimited ways to construct an arroz, none of which are wrong. Get creative &ndash start with meat if you want, layer in evenly-cut vegetables, and you can even add a healthy amount of sofrito for extra depth. Garlic, saffron, rosemary, pimettón, bay leaves &ndash all will help add flavor to the rice, if used in balance. Here are two of our favorite recipes.

Seafood Paella

For the Salmorra:
INGREDIENTS
1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil, preferably José Andrés Extra Virgin Olive Oil
12 cloves garlic, peeled
3 ñora chile peppers (or any other dried sweet chile pepper), seeded
One 16-ounces can plum tomatoes, drained
1 teaspoon sugar
1/8 teaspoon Spanish smoked paprika

Heat the oil in a medium pot over medium heat. Add garlic and sauté until soft, about 2 minutes.

Add the chile peppers and toast, stirring, for about 3 minutes, then add the tomatoes and sugar.

Cook until the liquid evaporates and the mixture is a dark red-brown color, about 15 minutes. Stir in the paprika.

Transfer the mixture to a blender and purée. Pour into a bowl, and season with salt, to taste.

Notes: Salmorra may be kept in the refrigerator, covered with plastic wrap, for up to 10 days. Drizzle the top with olive oil to keep sauce from drying out.

For the rice:
INGREDIENTS
Extra virgin olive oil, preferably José Andrés Extra Virgin Olive Oil
8 large whole shrimp, peeled with heads and tails intact, deveined
4 ounces monkfish, cut into ½-inch cubes
2 ½ ounces fresh tuna, cut into 1/2-inch cubes
2 ounces fresh squid, cleaned and cut into ¼-inch rings
1 clove garlic, finely chopped
¼ cup Salmorra
1 cup Spanish bomba rice
Pinch of saffron
3 cups hot, high-quality seafood stock

Heat 2 tablespoons of the olive oil in a 13-inch paella pan over high heat.

Add the shrimp and sear for about 1 minute on each side. Transfer shrimp to a plate. Pour 2 more tablespoons of the olive oil into the paella pan, add the monkfish, tuna and squid and sauté for 2 minutes.

Stir in the garlic and cook for 1 minute. Add the salmorra and rice and cook for 1 minute more, stirring to coat the rice with the sauce. Set a timer for 5 minutes, increase the heat to high and add the hot stock.

Bring to a boil, add the saffron and season with salt. Stir the rice during the first 5 minutes while boiling, then lower the heat and simmer for an additional 11 minutes. Do not stir the rice again as it may cause it to cook unevenly. After about 8 minutes, lay the reserved shrimp on top of the paella to finish cooking for last few minutes. The paella is finished when the rice has absorbed all of the liquid.

Remove the paella from the heat, cover with a clean kitchen towel and let the paella rest for 5 minutes before serving. Serve with spoonful&rsquos of aioli (garlic mayonnaise) and a green salad, if you like.

Vegetable Arroz

INGREDIENTS
¼ cup Spanish extra virgin olive oil
2 yellow squash, cut in ½&rdquo cubes
1 medium eggplant, cut in ½&rdquo cubes
1 cauliflower, broken into florets
¼ pound wild mushrooms, roughly chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 tomatoes, diced
¼ cup Sofrito
1 cup dry white wine
Pinch of saffron, crushed
3 cups vegetable broth, like Aneto
1 cup Spanish bomba or calasparra rice
¼ cup fresh or frozen green peas
Sea salt, to taste
Allioli, for serving

In a 13-inch paella pan, heat the extra virgin olive oil over medium-high heat. Add the squash to the pan and brown it on all sides. Add the squash and cauliflower and cook for another 2-3 minutes, then add the mushrooms and garlic and cook for another 2-3 minutes. Stir in the diced tomatoes and the sofrito and cook for a minute, then add the white wine and reduce everything by half.

Add the crushed saffron to the pan and then the broth. Increase the heat to high and bring to a boil, then let it boil for 2-3 minutes. Add the rice and peas and stir until everything is combined, then add salt to taste. Check the box or bag the rice came in &ndash you&rsquoll want to cook the rice as long as is recommended (timing can vary by rice type &ndash always keep the bag!) You want the rice to be slightly al dente, with a nice firm center. Set a timer, and then don&rsquot stir as the rice is cooking. When you have 2 minutes left, increase the heat to high to get the crunchy soccarat at the bottom of the pan. When the rice is done, remove the pan from the heat and let it sit for 5 minutes before serving.

Serve with allioli and share the soccarat with everyone &ndash no matter how much you want to save it exclusively for the chef (yourself).


Learn To Cook Paella At Home

Paella started as a humble countryside meal, cooked by farmers and herders in the fields and mountains surrounding Valencia and Alicante. Now it is world-famous, a symbol of Spanish cuisine so recognizable that it has even become its own emoji. Making paella is an art but it&rsquos not impossible for a home cook &ndash it just takes some care and patience.

What You'll Need

The Pan: The proper cookware for making paella and other arroces is a round flat pan called &ndash you guessed it &ndash a paella. The best paella pans are steel stainless for minimal care, carbon steel for something more traditional &ndash which ensures that heat is evenly distributed. Pans can range in size from 10 inches, which will serve two people, to more than a meter, for serving the masses. Check out paella pans here.

The Rice: One of the keys to great paella is using the proper rice &ndash not just anything will do. Two Spanish varieties &ndash bomba and calasparra &ndash are favored for their unique ability to expand to 2-3 times their size, absorbing flavorful liquid as they grow, without getting soft or mushy. Buy our favorite Calasparra rice here.

The Ingredients: Get creative &ndash start with meat if you want, layer in evenly-cut vegetables, and you can even add a healthy amount of sofrito for extra depth. Garlic, saffron, rosemary, pimentón, bay leaves &ndash all will help add flavor to the rice, if used in balance.

The Liquid: Water is oftentimes the best for making a good paella, if you've built up enough flavor with your ingredients. If you happen to have a good homemade vegetable or meat stock on hand, use it &ndash you&rsquoll get a deeper flavor in the rice, but be sure to balance out adding salt. This is our favorite broth for making paella.

The Heat: Traditionally, paella is cooked over a wood fire outdoors &ndash oftentimes starting with logs of wood and ending with a burst of high heat from dried vine clippings. This gives the paella a wonderful wood smoky aroma which complements the addition of pimentón, and the final kick of high heat helps ensure a crispy socarrat. In the absence of an outdoor cooking space, gas or electric heat will do &ndash just make sure it&rsquos even under the pan.

The Timing: Once the rice is in the pan, it&rsquos time to set a clock and wait. This is both the easiest and most challenging moment of the process: patience is key. Every rice is different, based on its variety and its age, and oftentimes the best way to tell how long it should be cooked is to read the instructions on the bag.

Get that soccarat. Near the end of cooking, with just a few minutes remaining, crank the heat up &ndash that&rsquos how you&rsquoll get the delicious crunchy soccarat at the bottom of the rice.

Get Creative In The Kitchen

There is a time and a place for the traditional Valencian paella, made with rabbit, chicken, two kinds of beans, rosemary, and saffron. And then there&rsquos a time and place for everything else &ndash there are unlimited ways to construct an arroz, none of which are wrong. Get creative &ndash start with meat if you want, layer in evenly-cut vegetables, and you can even add a healthy amount of sofrito for extra depth. Garlic, saffron, rosemary, pimettón, bay leaves &ndash all will help add flavor to the rice, if used in balance. Here are two of our favorite recipes.

Seafood Paella

For the Salmorra:
INGREDIENTS
1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil, preferably José Andrés Extra Virgin Olive Oil
12 cloves garlic, peeled
3 ñora chile peppers (or any other dried sweet chile pepper), seeded
One 16-ounces can plum tomatoes, drained
1 teaspoon sugar
1/8 teaspoon Spanish smoked paprika

Heat the oil in a medium pot over medium heat. Add garlic and sauté until soft, about 2 minutes.

Add the chile peppers and toast, stirring, for about 3 minutes, then add the tomatoes and sugar.

Cook until the liquid evaporates and the mixture is a dark red-brown color, about 15 minutes. Stir in the paprika.

Transfer the mixture to a blender and purée. Pour into a bowl, and season with salt, to taste.

Notes: Salmorra may be kept in the refrigerator, covered with plastic wrap, for up to 10 days. Drizzle the top with olive oil to keep sauce from drying out.

For the rice:
INGREDIENTS
Extra virgin olive oil, preferably José Andrés Extra Virgin Olive Oil
8 large whole shrimp, peeled with heads and tails intact, deveined
4 ounces monkfish, cut into ½-inch cubes
2 ½ ounces fresh tuna, cut into 1/2-inch cubes
2 ounces fresh squid, cleaned and cut into ¼-inch rings
1 clove garlic, finely chopped
¼ cup Salmorra
1 cup Spanish bomba rice
Pinch of saffron
3 cups hot, high-quality seafood stock

Heat 2 tablespoons of the olive oil in a 13-inch paella pan over high heat.

Add the shrimp and sear for about 1 minute on each side. Transfer shrimp to a plate. Pour 2 more tablespoons of the olive oil into the paella pan, add the monkfish, tuna and squid and sauté for 2 minutes.

Stir in the garlic and cook for 1 minute. Add the salmorra and rice and cook for 1 minute more, stirring to coat the rice with the sauce. Set a timer for 5 minutes, increase the heat to high and add the hot stock.

Bring to a boil, add the saffron and season with salt. Stir the rice during the first 5 minutes while boiling, then lower the heat and simmer for an additional 11 minutes. Do not stir the rice again as it may cause it to cook unevenly. After about 8 minutes, lay the reserved shrimp on top of the paella to finish cooking for last few minutes. The paella is finished when the rice has absorbed all of the liquid.

Remove the paella from the heat, cover with a clean kitchen towel and let the paella rest for 5 minutes before serving. Serve with spoonful&rsquos of aioli (garlic mayonnaise) and a green salad, if you like.

Vegetable Arroz

INGREDIENTS
¼ cup Spanish extra virgin olive oil
2 yellow squash, cut in ½&rdquo cubes
1 medium eggplant, cut in ½&rdquo cubes
1 cauliflower, broken into florets
¼ pound wild mushrooms, roughly chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 tomatoes, diced
¼ cup Sofrito
1 cup dry white wine
Pinch of saffron, crushed
3 cups vegetable broth, like Aneto
1 cup Spanish bomba or calasparra rice
¼ cup fresh or frozen green peas
Sea salt, to taste
Allioli, for serving

In a 13-inch paella pan, heat the extra virgin olive oil over medium-high heat. Add the squash to the pan and brown it on all sides. Add the squash and cauliflower and cook for another 2-3 minutes, then add the mushrooms and garlic and cook for another 2-3 minutes. Stir in the diced tomatoes and the sofrito and cook for a minute, then add the white wine and reduce everything by half.

Add the crushed saffron to the pan and then the broth. Increase the heat to high and bring to a boil, then let it boil for 2-3 minutes. Add the rice and peas and stir until everything is combined, then add salt to taste. Check the box or bag the rice came in &ndash you&rsquoll want to cook the rice as long as is recommended (timing can vary by rice type &ndash always keep the bag!) You want the rice to be slightly al dente, with a nice firm center. Set a timer, and then don&rsquot stir as the rice is cooking. When you have 2 minutes left, increase the heat to high to get the crunchy soccarat at the bottom of the pan. When the rice is done, remove the pan from the heat and let it sit for 5 minutes before serving.

Serve with allioli and share the soccarat with everyone &ndash no matter how much you want to save it exclusively for the chef (yourself).


Learn To Cook Paella At Home

Paella started as a humble countryside meal, cooked by farmers and herders in the fields and mountains surrounding Valencia and Alicante. Now it is world-famous, a symbol of Spanish cuisine so recognizable that it has even become its own emoji. Making paella is an art but it&rsquos not impossible for a home cook &ndash it just takes some care and patience.

What You'll Need

The Pan: The proper cookware for making paella and other arroces is a round flat pan called &ndash you guessed it &ndash a paella. The best paella pans are steel stainless for minimal care, carbon steel for something more traditional &ndash which ensures that heat is evenly distributed. Pans can range in size from 10 inches, which will serve two people, to more than a meter, for serving the masses. Check out paella pans here.

The Rice: One of the keys to great paella is using the proper rice &ndash not just anything will do. Two Spanish varieties &ndash bomba and calasparra &ndash are favored for their unique ability to expand to 2-3 times their size, absorbing flavorful liquid as they grow, without getting soft or mushy. Buy our favorite Calasparra rice here.

The Ingredients: Get creative &ndash start with meat if you want, layer in evenly-cut vegetables, and you can even add a healthy amount of sofrito for extra depth. Garlic, saffron, rosemary, pimentón, bay leaves &ndash all will help add flavor to the rice, if used in balance.

The Liquid: Water is oftentimes the best for making a good paella, if you've built up enough flavor with your ingredients. If you happen to have a good homemade vegetable or meat stock on hand, use it &ndash you&rsquoll get a deeper flavor in the rice, but be sure to balance out adding salt. This is our favorite broth for making paella.

The Heat: Traditionally, paella is cooked over a wood fire outdoors &ndash oftentimes starting with logs of wood and ending with a burst of high heat from dried vine clippings. This gives the paella a wonderful wood smoky aroma which complements the addition of pimentón, and the final kick of high heat helps ensure a crispy socarrat. In the absence of an outdoor cooking space, gas or electric heat will do &ndash just make sure it&rsquos even under the pan.

The Timing: Once the rice is in the pan, it&rsquos time to set a clock and wait. This is both the easiest and most challenging moment of the process: patience is key. Every rice is different, based on its variety and its age, and oftentimes the best way to tell how long it should be cooked is to read the instructions on the bag.

Get that soccarat. Near the end of cooking, with just a few minutes remaining, crank the heat up &ndash that&rsquos how you&rsquoll get the delicious crunchy soccarat at the bottom of the rice.

Get Creative In The Kitchen

There is a time and a place for the traditional Valencian paella, made with rabbit, chicken, two kinds of beans, rosemary, and saffron. And then there&rsquos a time and place for everything else &ndash there are unlimited ways to construct an arroz, none of which are wrong. Get creative &ndash start with meat if you want, layer in evenly-cut vegetables, and you can even add a healthy amount of sofrito for extra depth. Garlic, saffron, rosemary, pimettón, bay leaves &ndash all will help add flavor to the rice, if used in balance. Here are two of our favorite recipes.

Seafood Paella

For the Salmorra:
INGREDIENTS
1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil, preferably José Andrés Extra Virgin Olive Oil
12 cloves garlic, peeled
3 ñora chile peppers (or any other dried sweet chile pepper), seeded
One 16-ounces can plum tomatoes, drained
1 teaspoon sugar
1/8 teaspoon Spanish smoked paprika

Heat the oil in a medium pot over medium heat. Add garlic and sauté until soft, about 2 minutes.

Add the chile peppers and toast, stirring, for about 3 minutes, then add the tomatoes and sugar.

Cook until the liquid evaporates and the mixture is a dark red-brown color, about 15 minutes. Stir in the paprika.

Transfer the mixture to a blender and purée. Pour into a bowl, and season with salt, to taste.

Notes: Salmorra may be kept in the refrigerator, covered with plastic wrap, for up to 10 days. Drizzle the top with olive oil to keep sauce from drying out.

For the rice:
INGREDIENTS
Extra virgin olive oil, preferably José Andrés Extra Virgin Olive Oil
8 large whole shrimp, peeled with heads and tails intact, deveined
4 ounces monkfish, cut into ½-inch cubes
2 ½ ounces fresh tuna, cut into 1/2-inch cubes
2 ounces fresh squid, cleaned and cut into ¼-inch rings
1 clove garlic, finely chopped
¼ cup Salmorra
1 cup Spanish bomba rice
Pinch of saffron
3 cups hot, high-quality seafood stock

Heat 2 tablespoons of the olive oil in a 13-inch paella pan over high heat.

Add the shrimp and sear for about 1 minute on each side. Transfer shrimp to a plate. Pour 2 more tablespoons of the olive oil into the paella pan, add the monkfish, tuna and squid and sauté for 2 minutes.

Stir in the garlic and cook for 1 minute. Add the salmorra and rice and cook for 1 minute more, stirring to coat the rice with the sauce. Set a timer for 5 minutes, increase the heat to high and add the hot stock.

Bring to a boil, add the saffron and season with salt. Stir the rice during the first 5 minutes while boiling, then lower the heat and simmer for an additional 11 minutes. Do not stir the rice again as it may cause it to cook unevenly. After about 8 minutes, lay the reserved shrimp on top of the paella to finish cooking for last few minutes. The paella is finished when the rice has absorbed all of the liquid.

Remove the paella from the heat, cover with a clean kitchen towel and let the paella rest for 5 minutes before serving. Serve with spoonful&rsquos of aioli (garlic mayonnaise) and a green salad, if you like.

Vegetable Arroz

INGREDIENTS
¼ cup Spanish extra virgin olive oil
2 yellow squash, cut in ½&rdquo cubes
1 medium eggplant, cut in ½&rdquo cubes
1 cauliflower, broken into florets
¼ pound wild mushrooms, roughly chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 tomatoes, diced
¼ cup Sofrito
1 cup dry white wine
Pinch of saffron, crushed
3 cups vegetable broth, like Aneto
1 cup Spanish bomba or calasparra rice
¼ cup fresh or frozen green peas
Sea salt, to taste
Allioli, for serving

In a 13-inch paella pan, heat the extra virgin olive oil over medium-high heat. Add the squash to the pan and brown it on all sides. Add the squash and cauliflower and cook for another 2-3 minutes, then add the mushrooms and garlic and cook for another 2-3 minutes. Stir in the diced tomatoes and the sofrito and cook for a minute, then add the white wine and reduce everything by half.

Add the crushed saffron to the pan and then the broth. Increase the heat to high and bring to a boil, then let it boil for 2-3 minutes. Add the rice and peas and stir until everything is combined, then add salt to taste. Check the box or bag the rice came in &ndash you&rsquoll want to cook the rice as long as is recommended (timing can vary by rice type &ndash always keep the bag!) You want the rice to be slightly al dente, with a nice firm center. Set a timer, and then don&rsquot stir as the rice is cooking. When you have 2 minutes left, increase the heat to high to get the crunchy soccarat at the bottom of the pan. When the rice is done, remove the pan from the heat and let it sit for 5 minutes before serving.

Serve with allioli and share the soccarat with everyone &ndash no matter how much you want to save it exclusively for the chef (yourself).


Learn To Cook Paella At Home

Paella started as a humble countryside meal, cooked by farmers and herders in the fields and mountains surrounding Valencia and Alicante. Now it is world-famous, a symbol of Spanish cuisine so recognizable that it has even become its own emoji. Making paella is an art but it&rsquos not impossible for a home cook &ndash it just takes some care and patience.

What You'll Need

The Pan: The proper cookware for making paella and other arroces is a round flat pan called &ndash you guessed it &ndash a paella. The best paella pans are steel stainless for minimal care, carbon steel for something more traditional &ndash which ensures that heat is evenly distributed. Pans can range in size from 10 inches, which will serve two people, to more than a meter, for serving the masses. Check out paella pans here.

The Rice: One of the keys to great paella is using the proper rice &ndash not just anything will do. Two Spanish varieties &ndash bomba and calasparra &ndash are favored for their unique ability to expand to 2-3 times their size, absorbing flavorful liquid as they grow, without getting soft or mushy. Buy our favorite Calasparra rice here.

The Ingredients: Get creative &ndash start with meat if you want, layer in evenly-cut vegetables, and you can even add a healthy amount of sofrito for extra depth. Garlic, saffron, rosemary, pimentón, bay leaves &ndash all will help add flavor to the rice, if used in balance.

The Liquid: Water is oftentimes the best for making a good paella, if you've built up enough flavor with your ingredients. If you happen to have a good homemade vegetable or meat stock on hand, use it &ndash you&rsquoll get a deeper flavor in the rice, but be sure to balance out adding salt. This is our favorite broth for making paella.

The Heat: Traditionally, paella is cooked over a wood fire outdoors &ndash oftentimes starting with logs of wood and ending with a burst of high heat from dried vine clippings. This gives the paella a wonderful wood smoky aroma which complements the addition of pimentón, and the final kick of high heat helps ensure a crispy socarrat. In the absence of an outdoor cooking space, gas or electric heat will do &ndash just make sure it&rsquos even under the pan.

The Timing: Once the rice is in the pan, it&rsquos time to set a clock and wait. This is both the easiest and most challenging moment of the process: patience is key. Every rice is different, based on its variety and its age, and oftentimes the best way to tell how long it should be cooked is to read the instructions on the bag.

Get that soccarat. Near the end of cooking, with just a few minutes remaining, crank the heat up &ndash that&rsquos how you&rsquoll get the delicious crunchy soccarat at the bottom of the rice.

Get Creative In The Kitchen

There is a time and a place for the traditional Valencian paella, made with rabbit, chicken, two kinds of beans, rosemary, and saffron. And then there&rsquos a time and place for everything else &ndash there are unlimited ways to construct an arroz, none of which are wrong. Get creative &ndash start with meat if you want, layer in evenly-cut vegetables, and you can even add a healthy amount of sofrito for extra depth. Garlic, saffron, rosemary, pimettón, bay leaves &ndash all will help add flavor to the rice, if used in balance. Here are two of our favorite recipes.

Seafood Paella

For the Salmorra:
INGREDIENTS
1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil, preferably José Andrés Extra Virgin Olive Oil
12 cloves garlic, peeled
3 ñora chile peppers (or any other dried sweet chile pepper), seeded
One 16-ounces can plum tomatoes, drained
1 teaspoon sugar
1/8 teaspoon Spanish smoked paprika

Heat the oil in a medium pot over medium heat. Add garlic and sauté until soft, about 2 minutes.

Add the chile peppers and toast, stirring, for about 3 minutes, then add the tomatoes and sugar.

Cook until the liquid evaporates and the mixture is a dark red-brown color, about 15 minutes. Stir in the paprika.

Transfer the mixture to a blender and purée. Pour into a bowl, and season with salt, to taste.

Notes: Salmorra may be kept in the refrigerator, covered with plastic wrap, for up to 10 days. Drizzle the top with olive oil to keep sauce from drying out.

For the rice:
INGREDIENTS
Extra virgin olive oil, preferably José Andrés Extra Virgin Olive Oil
8 large whole shrimp, peeled with heads and tails intact, deveined
4 ounces monkfish, cut into ½-inch cubes
2 ½ ounces fresh tuna, cut into 1/2-inch cubes
2 ounces fresh squid, cleaned and cut into ¼-inch rings
1 clove garlic, finely chopped
¼ cup Salmorra
1 cup Spanish bomba rice
Pinch of saffron
3 cups hot, high-quality seafood stock

Heat 2 tablespoons of the olive oil in a 13-inch paella pan over high heat.

Add the shrimp and sear for about 1 minute on each side. Transfer shrimp to a plate. Pour 2 more tablespoons of the olive oil into the paella pan, add the monkfish, tuna and squid and sauté for 2 minutes.

Stir in the garlic and cook for 1 minute. Add the salmorra and rice and cook for 1 minute more, stirring to coat the rice with the sauce. Set a timer for 5 minutes, increase the heat to high and add the hot stock.

Bring to a boil, add the saffron and season with salt. Stir the rice during the first 5 minutes while boiling, then lower the heat and simmer for an additional 11 minutes. Do not stir the rice again as it may cause it to cook unevenly. After about 8 minutes, lay the reserved shrimp on top of the paella to finish cooking for last few minutes. The paella is finished when the rice has absorbed all of the liquid.

Remove the paella from the heat, cover with a clean kitchen towel and let the paella rest for 5 minutes before serving. Serve with spoonful&rsquos of aioli (garlic mayonnaise) and a green salad, if you like.

Vegetable Arroz

INGREDIENTS
¼ cup Spanish extra virgin olive oil
2 yellow squash, cut in ½&rdquo cubes
1 medium eggplant, cut in ½&rdquo cubes
1 cauliflower, broken into florets
¼ pound wild mushrooms, roughly chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 tomatoes, diced
¼ cup Sofrito
1 cup dry white wine
Pinch of saffron, crushed
3 cups vegetable broth, like Aneto
1 cup Spanish bomba or calasparra rice
¼ cup fresh or frozen green peas
Sea salt, to taste
Allioli, for serving

In a 13-inch paella pan, heat the extra virgin olive oil over medium-high heat. Add the squash to the pan and brown it on all sides. Add the squash and cauliflower and cook for another 2-3 minutes, then add the mushrooms and garlic and cook for another 2-3 minutes. Stir in the diced tomatoes and the sofrito and cook for a minute, then add the white wine and reduce everything by half.

Add the crushed saffron to the pan and then the broth. Increase the heat to high and bring to a boil, then let it boil for 2-3 minutes. Add the rice and peas and stir until everything is combined, then add salt to taste. Check the box or bag the rice came in &ndash you&rsquoll want to cook the rice as long as is recommended (timing can vary by rice type &ndash always keep the bag!) You want the rice to be slightly al dente, with a nice firm center. Set a timer, and then don&rsquot stir as the rice is cooking. When you have 2 minutes left, increase the heat to high to get the crunchy soccarat at the bottom of the pan. When the rice is done, remove the pan from the heat and let it sit for 5 minutes before serving.

Serve with allioli and share the soccarat with everyone &ndash no matter how much you want to save it exclusively for the chef (yourself).


Learn To Cook Paella At Home

Paella started as a humble countryside meal, cooked by farmers and herders in the fields and mountains surrounding Valencia and Alicante. Now it is world-famous, a symbol of Spanish cuisine so recognizable that it has even become its own emoji. Making paella is an art but it&rsquos not impossible for a home cook &ndash it just takes some care and patience.

What You'll Need

The Pan: The proper cookware for making paella and other arroces is a round flat pan called &ndash you guessed it &ndash a paella. The best paella pans are steel stainless for minimal care, carbon steel for something more traditional &ndash which ensures that heat is evenly distributed. Pans can range in size from 10 inches, which will serve two people, to more than a meter, for serving the masses. Check out paella pans here.

The Rice: One of the keys to great paella is using the proper rice &ndash not just anything will do. Two Spanish varieties &ndash bomba and calasparra &ndash are favored for their unique ability to expand to 2-3 times their size, absorbing flavorful liquid as they grow, without getting soft or mushy. Buy our favorite Calasparra rice here.

The Ingredients: Get creative &ndash start with meat if you want, layer in evenly-cut vegetables, and you can even add a healthy amount of sofrito for extra depth. Garlic, saffron, rosemary, pimentón, bay leaves &ndash all will help add flavor to the rice, if used in balance.

The Liquid: Water is oftentimes the best for making a good paella, if you've built up enough flavor with your ingredients. If you happen to have a good homemade vegetable or meat stock on hand, use it &ndash you&rsquoll get a deeper flavor in the rice, but be sure to balance out adding salt. This is our favorite broth for making paella.

The Heat: Traditionally, paella is cooked over a wood fire outdoors &ndash oftentimes starting with logs of wood and ending with a burst of high heat from dried vine clippings. This gives the paella a wonderful wood smoky aroma which complements the addition of pimentón, and the final kick of high heat helps ensure a crispy socarrat. In the absence of an outdoor cooking space, gas or electric heat will do &ndash just make sure it&rsquos even under the pan.

The Timing: Once the rice is in the pan, it&rsquos time to set a clock and wait. This is both the easiest and most challenging moment of the process: patience is key. Every rice is different, based on its variety and its age, and oftentimes the best way to tell how long it should be cooked is to read the instructions on the bag.

Get that soccarat. Near the end of cooking, with just a few minutes remaining, crank the heat up &ndash that&rsquos how you&rsquoll get the delicious crunchy soccarat at the bottom of the rice.

Get Creative In The Kitchen

There is a time and a place for the traditional Valencian paella, made with rabbit, chicken, two kinds of beans, rosemary, and saffron. And then there&rsquos a time and place for everything else &ndash there are unlimited ways to construct an arroz, none of which are wrong. Get creative &ndash start with meat if you want, layer in evenly-cut vegetables, and you can even add a healthy amount of sofrito for extra depth. Garlic, saffron, rosemary, pimettón, bay leaves &ndash all will help add flavor to the rice, if used in balance. Here are two of our favorite recipes.

Seafood Paella

For the Salmorra:
INGREDIENTS
1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil, preferably José Andrés Extra Virgin Olive Oil
12 cloves garlic, peeled
3 ñora chile peppers (or any other dried sweet chile pepper), seeded
One 16-ounces can plum tomatoes, drained
1 teaspoon sugar
1/8 teaspoon Spanish smoked paprika

Heat the oil in a medium pot over medium heat. Add garlic and sauté until soft, about 2 minutes.

Add the chile peppers and toast, stirring, for about 3 minutes, then add the tomatoes and sugar.

Cook until the liquid evaporates and the mixture is a dark red-brown color, about 15 minutes. Stir in the paprika.

Transfer the mixture to a blender and purée. Pour into a bowl, and season with salt, to taste.

Notes: Salmorra may be kept in the refrigerator, covered with plastic wrap, for up to 10 days. Drizzle the top with olive oil to keep sauce from drying out.

For the rice:
INGREDIENTS
Extra virgin olive oil, preferably José Andrés Extra Virgin Olive Oil
8 large whole shrimp, peeled with heads and tails intact, deveined
4 ounces monkfish, cut into ½-inch cubes
2 ½ ounces fresh tuna, cut into 1/2-inch cubes
2 ounces fresh squid, cleaned and cut into ¼-inch rings
1 clove garlic, finely chopped
¼ cup Salmorra
1 cup Spanish bomba rice
Pinch of saffron
3 cups hot, high-quality seafood stock

Heat 2 tablespoons of the olive oil in a 13-inch paella pan over high heat.

Add the shrimp and sear for about 1 minute on each side. Transfer shrimp to a plate. Pour 2 more tablespoons of the olive oil into the paella pan, add the monkfish, tuna and squid and sauté for 2 minutes.

Stir in the garlic and cook for 1 minute. Add the salmorra and rice and cook for 1 minute more, stirring to coat the rice with the sauce. Set a timer for 5 minutes, increase the heat to high and add the hot stock.

Bring to a boil, add the saffron and season with salt. Stir the rice during the first 5 minutes while boiling, then lower the heat and simmer for an additional 11 minutes. Do not stir the rice again as it may cause it to cook unevenly. After about 8 minutes, lay the reserved shrimp on top of the paella to finish cooking for last few minutes. The paella is finished when the rice has absorbed all of the liquid.

Remove the paella from the heat, cover with a clean kitchen towel and let the paella rest for 5 minutes before serving. Serve with spoonful&rsquos of aioli (garlic mayonnaise) and a green salad, if you like.

Vegetable Arroz

INGREDIENTS
¼ cup Spanish extra virgin olive oil
2 yellow squash, cut in ½&rdquo cubes
1 medium eggplant, cut in ½&rdquo cubes
1 cauliflower, broken into florets
¼ pound wild mushrooms, roughly chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 tomatoes, diced
¼ cup Sofrito
1 cup dry white wine
Pinch of saffron, crushed
3 cups vegetable broth, like Aneto
1 cup Spanish bomba or calasparra rice
¼ cup fresh or frozen green peas
Sea salt, to taste
Allioli, for serving

In a 13-inch paella pan, heat the extra virgin olive oil over medium-high heat. Add the squash to the pan and brown it on all sides. Add the squash and cauliflower and cook for another 2-3 minutes, then add the mushrooms and garlic and cook for another 2-3 minutes. Stir in the diced tomatoes and the sofrito and cook for a minute, then add the white wine and reduce everything by half.

Add the crushed saffron to the pan and then the broth. Increase the heat to high and bring to a boil, then let it boil for 2-3 minutes. Add the rice and peas and stir until everything is combined, then add salt to taste. Check the box or bag the rice came in &ndash you&rsquoll want to cook the rice as long as is recommended (timing can vary by rice type &ndash always keep the bag!) You want the rice to be slightly al dente, with a nice firm center. Set a timer, and then don&rsquot stir as the rice is cooking. When you have 2 minutes left, increase the heat to high to get the crunchy soccarat at the bottom of the pan. When the rice is done, remove the pan from the heat and let it sit for 5 minutes before serving.

Serve with allioli and share the soccarat with everyone &ndash no matter how much you want to save it exclusively for the chef (yourself).


Learn To Cook Paella At Home

Paella started as a humble countryside meal, cooked by farmers and herders in the fields and mountains surrounding Valencia and Alicante. Now it is world-famous, a symbol of Spanish cuisine so recognizable that it has even become its own emoji. Making paella is an art but it&rsquos not impossible for a home cook &ndash it just takes some care and patience.

What You'll Need

The Pan: The proper cookware for making paella and other arroces is a round flat pan called &ndash you guessed it &ndash a paella. The best paella pans are steel stainless for minimal care, carbon steel for something more traditional &ndash which ensures that heat is evenly distributed. Pans can range in size from 10 inches, which will serve two people, to more than a meter, for serving the masses. Check out paella pans here.

The Rice: One of the keys to great paella is using the proper rice &ndash not just anything will do. Two Spanish varieties &ndash bomba and calasparra &ndash are favored for their unique ability to expand to 2-3 times their size, absorbing flavorful liquid as they grow, without getting soft or mushy. Buy our favorite Calasparra rice here.

The Ingredients: Get creative &ndash start with meat if you want, layer in evenly-cut vegetables, and you can even add a healthy amount of sofrito for extra depth. Garlic, saffron, rosemary, pimentón, bay leaves &ndash all will help add flavor to the rice, if used in balance.

The Liquid: Water is oftentimes the best for making a good paella, if you've built up enough flavor with your ingredients. If you happen to have a good homemade vegetable or meat stock on hand, use it &ndash you&rsquoll get a deeper flavor in the rice, but be sure to balance out adding salt. This is our favorite broth for making paella.

The Heat: Traditionally, paella is cooked over a wood fire outdoors &ndash oftentimes starting with logs of wood and ending with a burst of high heat from dried vine clippings. This gives the paella a wonderful wood smoky aroma which complements the addition of pimentón, and the final kick of high heat helps ensure a crispy socarrat. In the absence of an outdoor cooking space, gas or electric heat will do &ndash just make sure it&rsquos even under the pan.

The Timing: Once the rice is in the pan, it&rsquos time to set a clock and wait. This is both the easiest and most challenging moment of the process: patience is key. Every rice is different, based on its variety and its age, and oftentimes the best way to tell how long it should be cooked is to read the instructions on the bag.

Get that soccarat. Near the end of cooking, with just a few minutes remaining, crank the heat up &ndash that&rsquos how you&rsquoll get the delicious crunchy soccarat at the bottom of the rice.

Get Creative In The Kitchen

There is a time and a place for the traditional Valencian paella, made with rabbit, chicken, two kinds of beans, rosemary, and saffron. And then there&rsquos a time and place for everything else &ndash there are unlimited ways to construct an arroz, none of which are wrong. Get creative &ndash start with meat if you want, layer in evenly-cut vegetables, and you can even add a healthy amount of sofrito for extra depth. Garlic, saffron, rosemary, pimettón, bay leaves &ndash all will help add flavor to the rice, if used in balance. Here are two of our favorite recipes.

Seafood Paella

For the Salmorra:
INGREDIENTS
1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil, preferably José Andrés Extra Virgin Olive Oil
12 cloves garlic, peeled
3 ñora chile peppers (or any other dried sweet chile pepper), seeded
One 16-ounces can plum tomatoes, drained
1 teaspoon sugar
1/8 teaspoon Spanish smoked paprika

Heat the oil in a medium pot over medium heat. Add garlic and sauté until soft, about 2 minutes.

Add the chile peppers and toast, stirring, for about 3 minutes, then add the tomatoes and sugar.

Cook until the liquid evaporates and the mixture is a dark red-brown color, about 15 minutes. Stir in the paprika.

Transfer the mixture to a blender and purée. Pour into a bowl, and season with salt, to taste.

Notes: Salmorra may be kept in the refrigerator, covered with plastic wrap, for up to 10 days. Drizzle the top with olive oil to keep sauce from drying out.

For the rice:
INGREDIENTS
Extra virgin olive oil, preferably José Andrés Extra Virgin Olive Oil
8 large whole shrimp, peeled with heads and tails intact, deveined
4 ounces monkfish, cut into ½-inch cubes
2 ½ ounces fresh tuna, cut into 1/2-inch cubes
2 ounces fresh squid, cleaned and cut into ¼-inch rings
1 clove garlic, finely chopped
¼ cup Salmorra
1 cup Spanish bomba rice
Pinch of saffron
3 cups hot, high-quality seafood stock

Heat 2 tablespoons of the olive oil in a 13-inch paella pan over high heat.

Add the shrimp and sear for about 1 minute on each side. Transfer shrimp to a plate. Pour 2 more tablespoons of the olive oil into the paella pan, add the monkfish, tuna and squid and sauté for 2 minutes.

Stir in the garlic and cook for 1 minute. Add the salmorra and rice and cook for 1 minute more, stirring to coat the rice with the sauce. Set a timer for 5 minutes, increase the heat to high and add the hot stock.

Bring to a boil, add the saffron and season with salt. Stir the rice during the first 5 minutes while boiling, then lower the heat and simmer for an additional 11 minutes. Do not stir the rice again as it may cause it to cook unevenly. After about 8 minutes, lay the reserved shrimp on top of the paella to finish cooking for last few minutes. The paella is finished when the rice has absorbed all of the liquid.

Remove the paella from the heat, cover with a clean kitchen towel and let the paella rest for 5 minutes before serving. Serve with spoonful&rsquos of aioli (garlic mayonnaise) and a green salad, if you like.

Vegetable Arroz

INGREDIENTS
¼ cup Spanish extra virgin olive oil
2 yellow squash, cut in ½&rdquo cubes
1 medium eggplant, cut in ½&rdquo cubes
1 cauliflower, broken into florets
¼ pound wild mushrooms, roughly chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 tomatoes, diced
¼ cup Sofrito
1 cup dry white wine
Pinch of saffron, crushed
3 cups vegetable broth, like Aneto
1 cup Spanish bomba or calasparra rice
¼ cup fresh or frozen green peas
Sea salt, to taste
Allioli, for serving

In a 13-inch paella pan, heat the extra virgin olive oil over medium-high heat. Add the squash to the pan and brown it on all sides. Add the squash and cauliflower and cook for another 2-3 minutes, then add the mushrooms and garlic and cook for another 2-3 minutes. Stir in the diced tomatoes and the sofrito and cook for a minute, then add the white wine and reduce everything by half.

Add the crushed saffron to the pan and then the broth. Increase the heat to high and bring to a boil, then let it boil for 2-3 minutes. Add the rice and peas and stir until everything is combined, then add salt to taste. Check the box or bag the rice came in &ndash you&rsquoll want to cook the rice as long as is recommended (timing can vary by rice type &ndash always keep the bag!) You want the rice to be slightly al dente, with a nice firm center. Set a timer, and then don&rsquot stir as the rice is cooking. When you have 2 minutes left, increase the heat to high to get the crunchy soccarat at the bottom of the pan. When the rice is done, remove the pan from the heat and let it sit for 5 minutes before serving.

Serve with allioli and share the soccarat with everyone &ndash no matter how much you want to save it exclusively for the chef (yourself).


Learn To Cook Paella At Home

Paella started as a humble countryside meal, cooked by farmers and herders in the fields and mountains surrounding Valencia and Alicante. Now it is world-famous, a symbol of Spanish cuisine so recognizable that it has even become its own emoji. Making paella is an art but it&rsquos not impossible for a home cook &ndash it just takes some care and patience.

What You'll Need

The Pan: The proper cookware for making paella and other arroces is a round flat pan called &ndash you guessed it &ndash a paella. The best paella pans are steel stainless for minimal care, carbon steel for something more traditional &ndash which ensures that heat is evenly distributed. Pans can range in size from 10 inches, which will serve two people, to more than a meter, for serving the masses. Check out paella pans here.

The Rice: One of the keys to great paella is using the proper rice &ndash not just anything will do. Two Spanish varieties &ndash bomba and calasparra &ndash are favored for their unique ability to expand to 2-3 times their size, absorbing flavorful liquid as they grow, without getting soft or mushy. Buy our favorite Calasparra rice here.

The Ingredients: Get creative &ndash start with meat if you want, layer in evenly-cut vegetables, and you can even add a healthy amount of sofrito for extra depth. Garlic, saffron, rosemary, pimentón, bay leaves &ndash all will help add flavor to the rice, if used in balance.

The Liquid: Water is oftentimes the best for making a good paella, if you've built up enough flavor with your ingredients. If you happen to have a good homemade vegetable or meat stock on hand, use it &ndash you&rsquoll get a deeper flavor in the rice, but be sure to balance out adding salt. This is our favorite broth for making paella.

The Heat: Traditionally, paella is cooked over a wood fire outdoors &ndash oftentimes starting with logs of wood and ending with a burst of high heat from dried vine clippings. This gives the paella a wonderful wood smoky aroma which complements the addition of pimentón, and the final kick of high heat helps ensure a crispy socarrat. In the absence of an outdoor cooking space, gas or electric heat will do &ndash just make sure it&rsquos even under the pan.

The Timing: Once the rice is in the pan, it&rsquos time to set a clock and wait. This is both the easiest and most challenging moment of the process: patience is key. Every rice is different, based on its variety and its age, and oftentimes the best way to tell how long it should be cooked is to read the instructions on the bag.

Get that soccarat. Near the end of cooking, with just a few minutes remaining, crank the heat up &ndash that&rsquos how you&rsquoll get the delicious crunchy soccarat at the bottom of the rice.

Get Creative In The Kitchen

There is a time and a place for the traditional Valencian paella, made with rabbit, chicken, two kinds of beans, rosemary, and saffron. And then there&rsquos a time and place for everything else &ndash there are unlimited ways to construct an arroz, none of which are wrong. Get creative &ndash start with meat if you want, layer in evenly-cut vegetables, and you can even add a healthy amount of sofrito for extra depth. Garlic, saffron, rosemary, pimettón, bay leaves &ndash all will help add flavor to the rice, if used in balance. Here are two of our favorite recipes.

Seafood Paella

For the Salmorra:
INGREDIENTS
1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil, preferably José Andrés Extra Virgin Olive Oil
12 cloves garlic, peeled
3 ñora chile peppers (or any other dried sweet chile pepper), seeded
One 16-ounces can plum tomatoes, drained
1 teaspoon sugar
1/8 teaspoon Spanish smoked paprika

Heat the oil in a medium pot over medium heat. Add garlic and sauté until soft, about 2 minutes.

Add the chile peppers and toast, stirring, for about 3 minutes, then add the tomatoes and sugar.

Cook until the liquid evaporates and the mixture is a dark red-brown color, about 15 minutes. Stir in the paprika.

Transfer the mixture to a blender and purée. Pour into a bowl, and season with salt, to taste.

Notes: Salmorra may be kept in the refrigerator, covered with plastic wrap, for up to 10 days. Drizzle the top with olive oil to keep sauce from drying out.

For the rice:
INGREDIENTS
Extra virgin olive oil, preferably José Andrés Extra Virgin Olive Oil
8 large whole shrimp, peeled with heads and tails intact, deveined
4 ounces monkfish, cut into ½-inch cubes
2 ½ ounces fresh tuna, cut into 1/2-inch cubes
2 ounces fresh squid, cleaned and cut into ¼-inch rings
1 clove garlic, finely chopped
¼ cup Salmorra
1 cup Spanish bomba rice
Pinch of saffron
3 cups hot, high-quality seafood stock

Heat 2 tablespoons of the olive oil in a 13-inch paella pan over high heat.

Add the shrimp and sear for about 1 minute on each side. Transfer shrimp to a plate. Pour 2 more tablespoons of the olive oil into the paella pan, add the monkfish, tuna and squid and sauté for 2 minutes.

Stir in the garlic and cook for 1 minute. Add the salmorra and rice and cook for 1 minute more, stirring to coat the rice with the sauce. Set a timer for 5 minutes, increase the heat to high and add the hot stock.

Bring to a boil, add the saffron and season with salt. Stir the rice during the first 5 minutes while boiling, then lower the heat and simmer for an additional 11 minutes. Do not stir the rice again as it may cause it to cook unevenly. After about 8 minutes, lay the reserved shrimp on top of the paella to finish cooking for last few minutes. The paella is finished when the rice has absorbed all of the liquid.

Remove the paella from the heat, cover with a clean kitchen towel and let the paella rest for 5 minutes before serving. Serve with spoonful&rsquos of aioli (garlic mayonnaise) and a green salad, if you like.

Vegetable Arroz

INGREDIENTS
¼ cup Spanish extra virgin olive oil
2 yellow squash, cut in ½&rdquo cubes
1 medium eggplant, cut in ½&rdquo cubes
1 cauliflower, broken into florets
¼ pound wild mushrooms, roughly chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 tomatoes, diced
¼ cup Sofrito
1 cup dry white wine
Pinch of saffron, crushed
3 cups vegetable broth, like Aneto
1 cup Spanish bomba or calasparra rice
¼ cup fresh or frozen green peas
Sea salt, to taste
Allioli, for serving

In a 13-inch paella pan, heat the extra virgin olive oil over medium-high heat. Add the squash to the pan and brown it on all sides. Add the squash and cauliflower and cook for another 2-3 minutes, then add the mushrooms and garlic and cook for another 2-3 minutes. Stir in the diced tomatoes and the sofrito and cook for a minute, then add the white wine and reduce everything by half.

Add the crushed saffron to the pan and then the broth. Increase the heat to high and bring to a boil, then let it boil for 2-3 minutes. Add the rice and peas and stir until everything is combined, then add salt to taste. Check the box or bag the rice came in &ndash you&rsquoll want to cook the rice as long as is recommended (timing can vary by rice type &ndash always keep the bag!) You want the rice to be slightly al dente, with a nice firm center. Set a timer, and then don&rsquot stir as the rice is cooking. When you have 2 minutes left, increase the heat to high to get the crunchy soccarat at the bottom of the pan. When the rice is done, remove the pan from the heat and let it sit for 5 minutes before serving.

Serve with allioli and share the soccarat with everyone &ndash no matter how much you want to save it exclusively for the chef (yourself).


Learn To Cook Paella At Home

Paella started as a humble countryside meal, cooked by farmers and herders in the fields and mountains surrounding Valencia and Alicante. Now it is world-famous, a symbol of Spanish cuisine so recognizable that it has even become its own emoji. Making paella is an art but it&rsquos not impossible for a home cook &ndash it just takes some care and patience.

What You'll Need

The Pan: The proper cookware for making paella and other arroces is a round flat pan called &ndash you guessed it &ndash a paella. The best paella pans are steel stainless for minimal care, carbon steel for something more traditional &ndash which ensures that heat is evenly distributed. Pans can range in size from 10 inches, which will serve two people, to more than a meter, for serving the masses. Check out paella pans here.

The Rice: One of the keys to great paella is using the proper rice &ndash not just anything will do. Two Spanish varieties &ndash bomba and calasparra &ndash are favored for their unique ability to expand to 2-3 times their size, absorbing flavorful liquid as they grow, without getting soft or mushy. Buy our favorite Calasparra rice here.

The Ingredients: Get creative &ndash start with meat if you want, layer in evenly-cut vegetables, and you can even add a healthy amount of sofrito for extra depth. Garlic, saffron, rosemary, pimentón, bay leaves &ndash all will help add flavor to the rice, if used in balance.

The Liquid: Water is oftentimes the best for making a good paella, if you've built up enough flavor with your ingredients. If you happen to have a good homemade vegetable or meat stock on hand, use it &ndash you&rsquoll get a deeper flavor in the rice, but be sure to balance out adding salt. This is our favorite broth for making paella.

The Heat: Traditionally, paella is cooked over a wood fire outdoors &ndash oftentimes starting with logs of wood and ending with a burst of high heat from dried vine clippings. This gives the paella a wonderful wood smoky aroma which complements the addition of pimentón, and the final kick of high heat helps ensure a crispy socarrat. In the absence of an outdoor cooking space, gas or electric heat will do &ndash just make sure it&rsquos even under the pan.

The Timing: Once the rice is in the pan, it&rsquos time to set a clock and wait. This is both the easiest and most challenging moment of the process: patience is key. Every rice is different, based on its variety and its age, and oftentimes the best way to tell how long it should be cooked is to read the instructions on the bag.

Get that soccarat. Near the end of cooking, with just a few minutes remaining, crank the heat up &ndash that&rsquos how you&rsquoll get the delicious crunchy soccarat at the bottom of the rice.

Get Creative In The Kitchen

There is a time and a place for the traditional Valencian paella, made with rabbit, chicken, two kinds of beans, rosemary, and saffron. And then there&rsquos a time and place for everything else &ndash there are unlimited ways to construct an arroz, none of which are wrong. Get creative &ndash start with meat if you want, layer in evenly-cut vegetables, and you can even add a healthy amount of sofrito for extra depth. Garlic, saffron, rosemary, pimettón, bay leaves &ndash all will help add flavor to the rice, if used in balance. Here are two of our favorite recipes.

Seafood Paella

For the Salmorra:
INGREDIENTS
1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil, preferably José Andrés Extra Virgin Olive Oil
12 cloves garlic, peeled
3 ñora chile peppers (or any other dried sweet chile pepper), seeded
One 16-ounces can plum tomatoes, drained
1 teaspoon sugar
1/8 teaspoon Spanish smoked paprika

Heat the oil in a medium pot over medium heat. Add garlic and sauté until soft, about 2 minutes.

Add the chile peppers and toast, stirring, for about 3 minutes, then add the tomatoes and sugar.

Cook until the liquid evaporates and the mixture is a dark red-brown color, about 15 minutes. Stir in the paprika.

Transfer the mixture to a blender and purée. Pour into a bowl, and season with salt, to taste.

Notes: Salmorra may be kept in the refrigerator, covered with plastic wrap, for up to 10 days. Drizzle the top with olive oil to keep sauce from drying out.

For the rice:
INGREDIENTS
Extra virgin olive oil, preferably José Andrés Extra Virgin Olive Oil
8 large whole shrimp, peeled with heads and tails intact, deveined
4 ounces monkfish, cut into ½-inch cubes
2 ½ ounces fresh tuna, cut into 1/2-inch cubes
2 ounces fresh squid, cleaned and cut into ¼-inch rings
1 clove garlic, finely chopped
¼ cup Salmorra
1 cup Spanish bomba rice
Pinch of saffron
3 cups hot, high-quality seafood stock

Heat 2 tablespoons of the olive oil in a 13-inch paella pan over high heat.

Add the shrimp and sear for about 1 minute on each side. Transfer shrimp to a plate. Pour 2 more tablespoons of the olive oil into the paella pan, add the monkfish, tuna and squid and sauté for 2 minutes.

Stir in the garlic and cook for 1 minute. Add the salmorra and rice and cook for 1 minute more, stirring to coat the rice with the sauce. Set a timer for 5 minutes, increase the heat to high and add the hot stock.

Bring to a boil, add the saffron and season with salt. Stir the rice during the first 5 minutes while boiling, then lower the heat and simmer for an additional 11 minutes. Do not stir the rice again as it may cause it to cook unevenly. After about 8 minutes, lay the reserved shrimp on top of the paella to finish cooking for last few minutes. The paella is finished when the rice has absorbed all of the liquid.

Remove the paella from the heat, cover with a clean kitchen towel and let the paella rest for 5 minutes before serving. Serve with spoonful&rsquos of aioli (garlic mayonnaise) and a green salad, if you like.

Vegetable Arroz

INGREDIENTS
¼ cup Spanish extra virgin olive oil
2 yellow squash, cut in ½&rdquo cubes
1 medium eggplant, cut in ½&rdquo cubes
1 cauliflower, broken into florets
¼ pound wild mushrooms, roughly chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 tomatoes, diced
¼ cup Sofrito
1 cup dry white wine
Pinch of saffron, crushed
3 cups vegetable broth, like Aneto
1 cup Spanish bomba or calasparra rice
¼ cup fresh or frozen green peas
Sea salt, to taste
Allioli, for serving

In a 13-inch paella pan, heat the extra virgin olive oil over medium-high heat. Add the squash to the pan and brown it on all sides. Add the squash and cauliflower and cook for another 2-3 minutes, then add the mushrooms and garlic and cook for another 2-3 minutes. Stir in the diced tomatoes and the sofrito and cook for a minute, then add the white wine and reduce everything by half.

Add the crushed saffron to the pan and then the broth. Increase the heat to high and bring to a boil, then let it boil for 2-3 minutes. Add the rice and peas and stir until everything is combined, then add salt to taste. Check the box or bag the rice came in &ndash you&rsquoll want to cook the rice as long as is recommended (timing can vary by rice type &ndash always keep the bag!) You want the rice to be slightly al dente, with a nice firm center. Set a timer, and then don&rsquot stir as the rice is cooking. When you have 2 minutes left, increase the heat to high to get the crunchy soccarat at the bottom of the pan. When the rice is done, remove the pan from the heat and let it sit for 5 minutes before serving.

Serve with allioli and share the soccarat with everyone &ndash no matter how much you want to save it exclusively for the chef (yourself).


Learn To Cook Paella At Home

Paella started as a humble countryside meal, cooked by farmers and herders in the fields and mountains surrounding Valencia and Alicante. Now it is world-famous, a symbol of Spanish cuisine so recognizable that it has even become its own emoji. Making paella is an art but it&rsquos not impossible for a home cook &ndash it just takes some care and patience.

What You'll Need

The Pan: The proper cookware for making paella and other arroces is a round flat pan called &ndash you guessed it &ndash a paella. The best paella pans are steel stainless for minimal care, carbon steel for something more traditional &ndash which ensures that heat is evenly distributed. Pans can range in size from 10 inches, which will serve two people, to more than a meter, for serving the masses. Check out paella pans here.

The Rice: One of the keys to great paella is using the proper rice &ndash not just anything will do. Two Spanish varieties &ndash bomba and calasparra &ndash are favored for their unique ability to expand to 2-3 times their size, absorbing flavorful liquid as they grow, without getting soft or mushy. Buy our favorite Calasparra rice here.

The Ingredients: Get creative &ndash start with meat if you want, layer in evenly-cut vegetables, and you can even add a healthy amount of sofrito for extra depth. Garlic, saffron, rosemary, pimentón, bay leaves &ndash all will help add flavor to the rice, if used in balance.

The Liquid: Water is oftentimes the best for making a good paella, if you've built up enough flavor with your ingredients. If you happen to have a good homemade vegetable or meat stock on hand, use it &ndash you&rsquoll get a deeper flavor in the rice, but be sure to balance out adding salt. This is our favorite broth for making paella.

The Heat: Traditionally, paella is cooked over a wood fire outdoors &ndash oftentimes starting with logs of wood and ending with a burst of high heat from dried vine clippings. This gives the paella a wonderful wood smoky aroma which complements the addition of pimentón, and the final kick of high heat helps ensure a crispy socarrat. In the absence of an outdoor cooking space, gas or electric heat will do &ndash just make sure it&rsquos even under the pan.

The Timing: Once the rice is in the pan, it&rsquos time to set a clock and wait. This is both the easiest and most challenging moment of the process: patience is key. Every rice is different, based on its variety and its age, and oftentimes the best way to tell how long it should be cooked is to read the instructions on the bag.

Get that soccarat. Near the end of cooking, with just a few minutes remaining, crank the heat up &ndash that&rsquos how you&rsquoll get the delicious crunchy soccarat at the bottom of the rice.

Get Creative In The Kitchen

There is a time and a place for the traditional Valencian paella, made with rabbit, chicken, two kinds of beans, rosemary, and saffron. And then there&rsquos a time and place for everything else &ndash there are unlimited ways to construct an arroz, none of which are wrong. Get creative &ndash start with meat if you want, layer in evenly-cut vegetables, and you can even add a healthy amount of sofrito for extra depth. Garlic, saffron, rosemary, pimettón, bay leaves &ndash all will help add flavor to the rice, if used in balance. Here are two of our favorite recipes.

Seafood Paella

For the Salmorra:
INGREDIENTS
1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil, preferably José Andrés Extra Virgin Olive Oil
12 cloves garlic, peeled
3 ñora chile peppers (or any other dried sweet chile pepper), seeded
One 16-ounces can plum tomatoes, drained
1 teaspoon sugar
1/8 teaspoon Spanish smoked paprika

Heat the oil in a medium pot over medium heat. Add garlic and sauté until soft, about 2 minutes.

Add the chile peppers and toast, stirring, for about 3 minutes, then add the tomatoes and sugar.

Cook until the liquid evaporates and the mixture is a dark red-brown color, about 15 minutes. Stir in the paprika.

Transfer the mixture to a blender and purée. Pour into a bowl, and season with salt, to taste.

Notes: Salmorra may be kept in the refrigerator, covered with plastic wrap, for up to 10 days. Drizzle the top with olive oil to keep sauce from drying out.

For the rice:
INGREDIENTS
Extra virgin olive oil, preferably José Andrés Extra Virgin Olive Oil
8 large whole shrimp, peeled with heads and tails intact, deveined
4 ounces monkfish, cut into ½-inch cubes
2 ½ ounces fresh tuna, cut into 1/2-inch cubes
2 ounces fresh squid, cleaned and cut into ¼-inch rings
1 clove garlic, finely chopped
¼ cup Salmorra
1 cup Spanish bomba rice
Pinch of saffron
3 cups hot, high-quality seafood stock

Heat 2 tablespoons of the olive oil in a 13-inch paella pan over high heat.

Add the shrimp and sear for about 1 minute on each side. Transfer shrimp to a plate. Pour 2 more tablespoons of the olive oil into the paella pan, add the monkfish, tuna and squid and sauté for 2 minutes.

Stir in the garlic and cook for 1 minute. Add the salmorra and rice and cook for 1 minute more, stirring to coat the rice with the sauce. Set a timer for 5 minutes, increase the heat to high and add the hot stock.

Bring to a boil, add the saffron and season with salt. Stir the rice during the first 5 minutes while boiling, then lower the heat and simmer for an additional 11 minutes. Do not stir the rice again as it may cause it to cook unevenly. After about 8 minutes, lay the reserved shrimp on top of the paella to finish cooking for last few minutes. The paella is finished when the rice has absorbed all of the liquid.

Remove the paella from the heat, cover with a clean kitchen towel and let the paella rest for 5 minutes before serving. Serve with spoonful&rsquos of aioli (garlic mayonnaise) and a green salad, if you like.

Vegetable Arroz

INGREDIENTS
¼ cup Spanish extra virgin olive oil
2 yellow squash, cut in ½&rdquo cubes
1 medium eggplant, cut in ½&rdquo cubes
1 cauliflower, broken into florets
¼ pound wild mushrooms, roughly chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 tomatoes, diced
¼ cup Sofrito
1 cup dry white wine
Pinch of saffron, crushed
3 cups vegetable broth, like Aneto
1 cup Spanish bomba or calasparra rice
¼ cup fresh or frozen green peas
Sea salt, to taste
Allioli, for serving

In a 13-inch paella pan, heat the extra virgin olive oil over medium-high heat. Add the squash to the pan and brown it on all sides. Add the squash and cauliflower and cook for another 2-3 minutes, then add the mushrooms and garlic and cook for another 2-3 minutes. Stir in the diced tomatoes and the sofrito and cook for a minute, then add the white wine and reduce everything by half.

Add the crushed saffron to the pan and then the broth. Increase the heat to high and bring to a boil, then let it boil for 2-3 minutes. Add the rice and peas and stir until everything is combined, then add salt to taste. Check the box or bag the rice came in &ndash you&rsquoll want to cook the rice as long as is recommended (timing can vary by rice type &ndash always keep the bag!) You want the rice to be slightly al dente, with a nice firm center. Set a timer, and then don&rsquot stir as the rice is cooking. When you have 2 minutes left, increase the heat to high to get the crunchy soccarat at the bottom of the pan. When the rice is done, remove the pan from the heat and let it sit for 5 minutes before serving.

Serve with allioli and share the soccarat with everyone &ndash no matter how much you want to save it exclusively for the chef (yourself).



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